Saturday, March 30, 2019

Film Cameras at Disney World: Part 2

The second camera I brought with me to Walt Disney World was the Lomography Sprocket Rocket.


This camera is modeled after a toy Dick Tracy camera from the 1940's.  Like the Diana it is plastic and completely analog.  You wind the film manually, there is a dial for focusing distance, a switch for  shutter speed based on sunny vs. cloudy, and another switch to take the photo normally or in bulb mode (where you leave the shutter open as long as you want).  It takes 35mm film, but because the photos are more panoramic you get 18 shots instead of 36.  One of the coolest features though is that you can expose the entire piece of film, including the sprockets.

























Here's one that I took of the Tea Cups using Bulb Mode.

Conclusion: I'm a huge fan of this camera, no complaints.  It didn't wind itself in my back pack like the Diana did, and it even if it had, you can wind the film backwards to take multiple exposures.  It's super easy to use and load.  I was using ISO 200 film so I always left the light setting on cloudy to get a slightly longer shutter.  If you want to buy a fun film camera to take to the parks, I highly recommend the Sprocket Rocket.  You can pick on up here.


Friday, March 22, 2019

Film Cameras At Walt Disney World: Part 1

On my most recent trip to Walt Disney World I decided that instead of taking a digital camera around the parks I would bring different film cameras.  I took three with me, the first was the Diana F+.

Diana F+

The Diana was a plastic camera made in the 60's and used as a give away item at raffles and carnivals.  It was made of cheap plastic with a plastic lens and all analogue controls.  Because of this Diana's were know for light leaks, vignetting, blurring, and interesting colors. 

The Diana camera I have was made by Lomography.  They started making the Diana F+ in 2007 based off the original cameras.  The standard model comes with a plastic lens, I spent a little more and picked up the glass lens.  It uses 120 film so you get nice square photos.  You have the option of taking 12 or 16 shots based on the size you want your prints to come out. 

Here are my shots.






















Conclusion:  The Diana is a really fun camera to shoot around the parks.  It retails for $50, the glass lens will cost you another $50, but if you want more detail in your images it's worth it.  You can buy a 3 pack of 120 film for around $15, and it will cost you about the same to get each roll developed.  

The camera is completely analogue.  It's simple to use with only a few switches for sunny/cloudy exposure and the distance of your subject. It comes with instructions, plus there are a bunch if youtube videos if you need someone to walk you through loading the film.  The only real issue I had with the Diana was when I put it in my back pack it would wind itself and I ended up having to skip a frame.  Winding the film can be a bit sticky so it was odd to me that it would wind itself that much on it's own.  

If you're interested in picking up a Diana F+, you can find it here.